Ulster County’s Annual Creek Week

Creek-Week-final-2014

The 5th annual Creek Week will be held this year between September 13 and 21, 2014. This event is co-sponsored by Ulster County Environmental Management Council and Ulster County Department of the Environment.  Other collaborators include the Ashokan Watershed Stream Management Program, the Lower Esopus Watershed Partnership, and Riverkeeper.

 

2014 Ulster County Creek Week

 

September 13 – Falling Waters Preserve Hike

10AM; Falling Waters Preserve, Glasco

Falling Waters is a 168-acre preserve that contains two medium-sized cascades, ruins of the Mulford Ice House that reputedly was the largest on the Hudson River,as well as superlative views of the Hudson River. The preserve is part of the Dominican Sisters of Sparkill retreat. Moderate, 2-mile hike past two medium- sized cascades, and the historic ruins of the what is reputed to have been the largest ice-house on the Hudson River. Advanced registration required by 9/6/14 to bdelaney@nycap.rr.com. Part of the hike follows an old road and is easy; the other part follows an uneven surface next to the Hudson River with steep ascents and descents and is moderately difficult; wear good hiking boots; Not Wheelchair Accessible.

FMI, Contact Barbara Delaney & Russell Dunn at bdelaney@nycap.rr.com or (518) 482-2410. The Preserve is located at the end of Dominican Lane in Glasco , NY , 12432.

September 13 – John Burroughs Slabsides Geology Ramble

10AM; John Burroughs Nature Sanctuary at Slabsides, West Park

The rocks were one of literary naturalist John Burroughs’ favorite aspects of the Slabsides location, but even he did not realize that the rocks represented sediments eroded from a Himalayan-scale mountain range nearly 400 million years ago. Since they were deposited in a shallow sea, the sediments were repeatedly caught in continental collisions which bent them and stood them literally on end. As if that wasn’t enough, they were most recently scraped clean by a mile-thick sheet of glacial ice which melted a mere 14,000 years ago. Join Vassar College geology professor Jeff Walker for hike to read the many stories in the rocks of the John Burroughs Nature Sanctuary. The newly developed trails are part of the Hudson River Valley Greenway Trail System. Meet at Slabsides.

Expected time is 1.5 hours / 1.5 miles; Moderate difficulty level; Talus piles and some moderately rough terrain on new, well-developed trails, many with stone pathways and steps ; wear hiking boots or sturdy shoes and bring water and bug spray; Not Wheelchair Accessible; Additional Activities: Tour of “Slabsides,” a National Historic Landmark and a Hudson River Valley National Heritage Site of Special Interest. FMI, contact Joan Burroughs at info@johnburroughsassociation.org or 845-384-6320. The Preserve is located at Burroughs Drive, West Park , NY , 12493.

September 13 & 14 – Tugboats: Workhorses of the Hudson River

11AM-5PM; Hudson River Maritime Museum, Kingston

The Hudson River was the great natural highway into the interior of New York State for centuries, and transportation for people and goods was primarily by boat. Towboats and tugs pulling long strings of barges could be seen day and night on the Hudson from the 1850s through the 1930s. The Cornell Steamboat Company, headquartered in the Rondout area of Kingston, was the largest towing company on the Hudson with a virtual monopoly on river towing from the 1880s through the 1930s. Rondout, the port of Kingston, was a major shipping locus, and by far, the busiest port on the Hudson for most of the 19th century. This exhibition reviews this history with archival photographs, video, text panels and a replica tug pilot’s wheel house with authentic maritime devices. Museum admission fees apply: Adults – $7; Seniors (65+) & Students 4-18 — $5; Family rate – $20; children 4 & under free. Wheelchair Accessible. The HRMM is located at 50 Rondout Landing, Kingston , NY , 12401.

For more information on this seasonal exhibit or the HRMM, contact Lana Chassman, Director of Public Relations at lchassman@hrmm.org or (845)338-0071 ext 15.

 

 

September 13 – Kayak Tour of the Lower Esopus Creek

2PM-5PM; Tina Chorvas Park in Saugerties

As part of Ulster County Creek Week and the Hudson River Valley Ramble, Riverkeeper and the Lower Esopus Watershed Partnership, are hosting a kayak tour of the tidal Lower Esopus Creek. This trip is appropriate only for people who have previous kayak experience. Potential hazards include but are not limited to Hudson River tides and currents, as well as boat traffic. Anyone under 18 must be experienced in a boat and accompanied by an adult guardian.

Learn about the natural history and environmental issues facing the Lower Esopus Creek, with Riverkeeper’s Watershed Program Director Kate Hudson, The Lower Esopus Watershed Partnership’s Mary McNamara, Saugerties Lighthouse Keeper Patrick Landewe, and a local ecologist. The kayak tour will include the tidal Lower Esopus creek, with a stop at the grounds of the Saugerties Lighthouse. (Note: The Lighthouse is a working B&B, and there will not be a tour of the lighthouse itself.)

Riverkeeper has been working protect the creek from muddy discharges from the Ashokan Reservoir, and to test water quality as part of our Hudson River water quality study.

Cost is $10, and benefits Riverkeeper. Space is limited to 25 participants, and individuals may register no more than two people. Participants are encouraged to bring their own kayak equipment, including paddles and safety equipment, as well as water, food and sun protection. A limited number of kayak rentals are available for $25 each from I Paddle New York.

Questions? Contact Dana Gulley at dgulley@riverkeeper.org or 914-478-4501 x222. See more details and to buy tickets visit: http://www.riverkeeper.org/news-events/events/rvk-events/kayak-tour-of-the-tidal-lower-esopus/

 

September 13 – Saturday Night Sunset on the Walkway

6PM; Walkway Over the Hudson State Historic Park, Highland

 

Come stroll the walkway at Sunset. Walkway Over the Hudson State Historic Park will remain open to the general public until 8:00 p.m. on Saturday, September 13, 2014. Visitors will have an opportunity to stroll the Walkway under the late summer moon. Ambassadors will be on site to answer questions on the bridge’s history and current Walkway projects. An evening not to miss. To walk across and back is 2.5 miles, but Easy. Suitable for all ages-baby stroller and wheelchair accessible. For more information, contact Susanne O’Neil at soneil@walkway.org or 845-454-9649.  The Walkway Over the Hudson State Historic Park is located at 87 Haviland Rd, Highland , NY , 12528.

See more details on the Walkway Over the Hudson at: https://www.walkway.org/

 

September 14 – Warner Creek Stream Walk

time TBD; Chichester

Check back soon for more details. Hike led by Danyelle Davis. Event co-sponsored by the New York City DEP and the Ashokan Watershed Stream Management Program. Please meet at end of Silver Hollow Road, approximately 2 miles from intersection with Route 214, north of the hamlet of Phoenicia. For more information and to register, contact Brent Gotsch at bwg37@cornell.edu or 845-688-3047, extension 3.

 

September 16 – Esopus Creek Critters…Creepy, Crawly, and Critically Important

4–5:30PM; Phoenicia

Kids and adults are encouraged to join Aaron Bennett of the Ulster County Department of Environment in a rapid biological investigation and live analysis of the Upper Esopus Creek in Phoenicia. Participants will assist in collecting aquatic insects and other organisms that live underneath the rocks in the creek and are often used to determine the health of local streams. After collecting, sorting, and identifying what we were able to collect, we’ll discuss what the results mean, and what they don’t. Participants should come prepared with sturdy stream shoes and a liking for bugs!  FMI, contact Aaron Bennett at 845-340-3522 or aben@co.ulster.ny.us.

Participants please meet at the parking lot behind Riciardella’s restaurant on Main street Phoenicia. Afterwards, participants are welcome to join me and my family at “Taco Tuesday” at the Sportman’s Alamo Cantina for $1 tacos! (change of shoes recommended…)

 

September 17-18 – Water Resources Infrastructure: A Critical Piece of Community Development

9AM; Honors Haven Resort, Ellenville

Please join Cornell Cooperative Extension’s “Community Development Institute” for a dynamic two days of workshops & discussions. Key themes: Assessment of water resources infrastructure, Economic vitality, Smart growth. Goals: Informed decision making, Support sustainable regional community & economic vitality, Support innovation & forge new partnerships, Improve regional water quality, Integrate scientific, economic, planning/governmental & social expertise, Build comprehensive strategies for public asset & watershed management. Audience: The institute is designed for a diverse audience of local government officials (elected, appointed, & staff), CCE Educators, practitioners, economic developers, community leaders, and University and college faculty in the region.  Honors Haven Resort & Spa is located at 1195 Arrowhead Road in Ellenville, New York 12428. Cost is $30 for both days and includes meals.

 Read the Event Flyer; Visit the Event webpage and Register online

 

September 20 – Kingston Fall Foliage Morning Kayak Tour

9AM; Kingston Point Beach

Paddle the Hudson River during one of the most spectacular times of the year. These paddles launch from Kingston Point Beach. The trip includes instruction, equipment and guide. Event Duration is approximately 2 hours (approximately 2.5 miles); Level of difficulty = Easy, not suitable for children under 5; Trip Characteristics = Great for beginners, shallow, calm area on the Hudson. Additional Equipment required includes kayak equipment is (provided if needed) for the program, including boats. Not Wheelchair Accessible; Fee required of $40…. Kingston residents, children and those who provide own kayak equipment receive a $10 discount. Advanced registration is required and can be done online – please Register at least one day before the program – at www.kingstonparksandrec.org or call 845-481-7336.

Meeting location: Kingston Point Beach, 50 Delaware Avenue, Kingston , NY , 12401

 

September 20 & 21 – Tugboats: Workhorses of the Hudson River

11AM-5PM; Hudson River Maritime Museum, Kingston

The Hudson River was the great natural highway into the interior of New York State for centuries, and transportation for people and goods was primarily by boat. Towboats and tugs pulling long strings of barges could be seen day and night on the Hudson from the 1850s through the 1930s. The Cornell Steamboat Company, headquartered in the Rondout area of Kingston, was the largest towing company on the Hudson with a virtual monopoly on river towing from the 1880s through the 1930s. Rondout, the port of Kingston, was a major shipping locus, and by far, the busiest port on the Hudson for most of the 19th century. This exhibition reviews this history with archival photographs, video, text panels and a replica tug pilot’s wheel house with authentic maritime devices. Museum admission fees apply: Adults – $7; Seniors (65+) & Students 4-18 — $5; Family rate – $20; children 4 & under free. Wheelchair Accessible. The HRMM is located at 50 Rondout Landing, Kingston , NY , 12401.

For more information on this seasonal exhibit or the HRMM, contact Lana Chassman, Director of Public Relations at lchassman@hrmm.org or (845)338-0071 ext 15.

 

September 20 – Hudson River Lighthouse to Lighthouse Challenge

12PM; George Freer Park, Port Ewen

We are looking forward to welcoming paddlers to the Hudson River L2L Challenge along the Scenic Town of Esopus Shore. The Hudson River L2L is open to all sea-worthy, human-powered/paddled water craft including solo and tandem kayaks and canoes, surf skis and SUPs. Registration 11-11:45 am. George Freer Park lies in the shadow of the old Rondout 1 Lighthouse stand and the existing Rondout 2 Lighthouse marking the exit of the Rondout Creek into the Hudson, a great location for a pre paddle brunch and/or an after paddle picnic. Challenge participants will paddle from George Freer Park round trip around the Esopus Meadows Lighthouse, keeping the Esopus Meadows Lighthouse on their left, and return to George Freer Park (approximately 7 miles). Recording of paddling time is optional for Challenge participants. Rally participants are encouraged to paddle the beautiful Esopus Bay area meandering around the old Rondout 1 Lighthouse Stand and islands of Sleightsburg Park. All participants will receive an “Esopus Explorers” badge.

For more info contact Diane Dintruff at ddintruff@yahoo.com or 845-331-9321. Trip Duration is approximately 3 hours, total of  7 miles); Difficulty Level: Moderate, Not suitable for children under: 10. Hudson River conditions vary. A rally option exists to provide participants the option of staying in the more sheltered Esopus Bay area if conditions are difficult. Additional Equipment required includes (must provide own gear) participants must wear a PFD; Rentals available from Kenco, 1000 Hurley Mountain Road, Kingston, NY, 12401, 845-338-5021. Wheelchair Accessible

 

September 20 – Sunset Seining and Song

4PM; Esopus Meadows Preserve, Ulster Park

Clearwater Educators will take you into the water to catch fish in the “magic hour” of sunset. Enjoy the light, the coolness of the water, and find out what’s in the river at this time of year. Esopus Meadows beach is a great place to catch young-of-the-year fish, blue crabs, and maybe even an eel. We will discuss how the river gets ready for winter and why fishing at dusk is one of the best times of day. Bring a picnic for dinner afterwards and enjoy some music and the local wildlife. Seining program 1 hour, music to follow. A family friendly event. Event is wheelchair accessible, and please bring your own picnic dinner and musical instrument to join the sing-along after.

For more information, contact Eli Schloss at eli@clearwater.org or 845-797-2847. The Esopus Meadows Preserve
is at 257 River Road, Ulster Park , NY , 12487. Learn more about Clearwater  at: http://www.clearwater.org/

 

September 21 – Kids Fishing Day at Ashokan Reservoir

9AM; West Hurley

DEP and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will host a fishing event for children and their parents. Poles and bait will be supplied, but feel free to bring your own. As part of the state’s “I Fish NY Program,” the requirement for a fishing license will be waived for adults who want to join their children at the event. DEP and DEC staff will be available to teach participants how to fish and assist as needed. Adults who don’t have a free DEP access permit will be able to obtain one at the event. Ashokan Reservoir is home to many different species of fish, including smallmouth and largemouth bass, yellow and white perch, yellow and brown bullhead, sunfish, and trout. The fishing event will begin at 9 a.m. at the Woodstock Dike. A parking lot is located on a gravel road off Route 28, just east of the West Hurley Post Office.

 

September 27 – Native Pollinators Workshop

10AM – 1PM; Frost Valley Model Farm, Denning

Did you know that the mining bee deposits 2 to 3 times more pollen than honeybees per apple blossom visit? And that many native bees are solitary nesters dependent on undisturbed soil to find a suitable home? Or that squash bees actually sleep in the flowers they pollinate? How about the power of 250 mason bees, which can efficiently pollinate an acre of apple trees; while that same acre could require the services of nearly 40,000 honeybees?  Join the Rondout Neversink Stream Program at Frost Valley YMCA Education Farm to learn more about the fascinating world of native pollinators from educator Tim Stanley on Saturday, September 27 from 10am-1pm.

According to the pollinator-friendly Xerces Society (xerces.org), native pollinators are essential to our environment, serving as a keystone species in most terrestrial ecosystems. Fruits and seeds derived from insect pollination are a major part of the diet of approximately 25 percent of all birds, and a wide range of mammals from voles to bears. In many  places, this essential service by pollinators is at risk from habitat loss, pesticide us and introduced diseases.

“The single most cost- effective step landowners can take in protecting their stream bank is to stop mowing to the edge of the river and allow the riparian area to develop plant root systems stronger than what a  lawn provides,” says Stacie Howell, Catskill Streams Buffer Coordinator in Denning and Neversink.  But there’s more: roughly 70% of bee species build nests underground – we can encourage them by providing forage and conserving sandy soil and bare ground. Roughly 30% nest in hollow plant stems, or old beetle borer holes – by conserving snags, brush piles and pithy stemmed plants, we give them places to thrive.  Behavior of native pollinator species will be covered in the workshop, so participants can understand that the worst case scenario of “roughing up your buffer” is increasing the diversity of flowering trees, shrubs and wildflower blossoms while increasing habitat opportunities for these helpful streamside denizens.

The presenter, Tim Stanley, is Environmental Education Coordinator at The Fresh Air Fund’s Sharpe Environmental Center and a Master Natural with Cornell Cooperative Extension, who founded the Native Beeology field guide and website to promote a greater understanding of native pollinators. A graduate of SUNY ESF, Stanley served as a Forest Ranger for the Maryland Forest Service, where he taught Smokey Bear programs, prepared high school students to compete in Envirothon and worked with landowners to create stream-side buffers.  He also serves as President of the NY State Outdoor Education Association.

Frost Valley YMCA Education Farm is located at 2849 Denning Road, Denning NY. There is no cost for this workshop, which is co-sponsored by Frost Valley YMCA and Rondout Neversink Stream Program, a project of Sullivan County Soil & Water Conservation District funded by NYC Department of Environmental Protection. 845-985-2581; http://www.sullivanswcd.org

 

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Archive of the 2013 Events

“Rivers on Drugs” (presentation)

Kids Fishing Day at the Ashokan Reservoir

Kids Fishing Day at the Ashokan Reservoir

Family Day at the HRMM! 

Say No to Knotweed! ID & Control of Invasive Japanese Knotweed for Landowners 

Hudson River Morning Kayak Tour

Rondout Creek Clean-Up…by Boat

Kayak Tour of the Tidal Lower Esopus

 

Weekend Volunteer Restoration Workday – Black Creek Preserve

Hudson River Evening Kayak Tour

Youth Fishing Frenzy 

Gear-Cleaning Demonstration: Do your Part to Help Stop the Spread of Invasive Species

 Kayak Tour of Tidal Lower Esopus

Kayak Tour of Tidal Lower Esopus

 

“Sailing the Belle Aventure” (presentation)

Esopus Creek Critters…Creepy, Crawly, and Critically Important

Catskill Native Plant Society Hike

Kayak Tour, Esopus Bend Nature Preserve

 

Minnewaska Wonders: Mine Hole Waterfall and Point Lookout Hike

Kids Fishing Day at the Ashokan Reservoir

Rosendale Fishing Day on the Rondout Creek

Climate Change at the LOCAL Level (presentation)

Esopus Creek Critters

Esopus Creek Critters

 

Hudson River Morning Kayak Tour

Kanape Brook Stream Walk

Hudson River Evening Kayak Tour

2012 CREEK WEEK RECAP:

The 3nd annual Creek Week was co-sponsored by Ulster County Environmental Management Council and Ulster County Department of the Environment.  Other collaborators for this year’s Creek Week included the Ashokan Watershed Stream Management Program, the Lower Esopus Watershed Partnership, and Riverkeeper.

Over 250 people participated in last year’s celebration. With 25 events held, 2012 was the biggest Creek Week yet. For details on the events from last year: DOWNLOAD a print version (PDF) of the Events.

HISTORY:

Creek Week is intended to help build awareness and encourage the enjoyment of water and watersheds in Ulster County.

 The Ulster County Department of Environment and the Environmental Management Council believe that an annual Creek Week will better connect people to our fantastic Ulster County environment – particularly our watersheds and water resources. We hope that people use these events to learn more about what is just outside their door, learn something about how they can protect or improve the environment, enjoy time outside with friends and family, and to have fun.

Archive of the 2012 Events

Hurley BioBlitz participants collecting stream organisms

Leaping Trout Art Trail

Town of Hurley BioBlitz!

Up the Creek Kayak Tour

Hudson River Good Morning Paddle

Mushroom Walk at Esopus Bend

Muddy Waters! Ashokan Reservoir Releases into the Lower Esopus Creek

Town of Hurley 350th Anniversary Celebration

Young anglers enjoying the fishing sponsored by the Town of Rosendale and the Federated Sportsman of Ulster County on the Rondout as part of Creek Week 2012.

Guided Kayak Paddle on Rondout Creek

HRMM and Clearwater Barn Raising!

Stream Monitoring – Family Fun

Sunset Seine and Sing at Esopus Meadows

Hudson River Sunset Paddle

Creek Speak: Walk Birch Creek with Soil & Water’s stream expert Cory Ritz

“One Year after the Flood” Hike

How’s the Water?

“Last Call at the Oasis”

“Creak Speak’ers” sample aquatic organisms in the Birch Creek near Pine Hill.

Impacts of Tropical Storms Irene and Lee had on the Hudson River Estuary and watershed

Lecture Series: “Kingston: Past and Present”

Rosendale Fishing Day on the Rondout Creek

Kayak Tour of the Tidal Lower Esopus

Byrdecliffe Trail Hike

Guided Kayak Paddle on Rondout Creek

Hike to Mine Hole Waterfall

Book Signing “Ramblings of a Charmed Circle Flyfisher”

John Burroughs Slabsides Ramble

Lower Esopus Kayak Tour paddlers exploring its confluence with the Hudson River at Saugerties

Responses

  1. [...] Tour of the Tidal Lower Esopus – 9:30AM – 1PM As part of Ulster County Creek Week, Riverkeeper and the Lower Esopus Watershed Partnership, with TrailCross.com and Kenco are hosting [...]


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